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How Natural Cures Beat Antibiotics in the Body’s Germ Warfare

All things being equal, this is not about knocking one method right out the park in favour of another. Reasonableness makes room for all considerations but let no one imagine that natural cures are weaker than allopathic medicines when our bodies fight germs. Let’s take a brief look at the strategies so that we can make informed choices about our health and that of our loved ones. 

On the back of innovators such as Louis Pasteur and Alexander Flemming who championed antiseptic and antibiotic procedures respectively, Frenchman Claude Bechamp explored the marvels of the body’s own defence systems. He postulated that far more effective killing off invader germs in a system already compromised enough to have failed us, we pay attention to boosting our immune responses and let them do their job of warding off infections. 

To this day conventional allopathic medicines follow the Pasteur-Flemming approach of killing germs over and over again each time invading germs or viruses appear. Natural medicine, however, favours keeping the terrain of our organisms strong enough to win the war on germs every day. Either way, it makes sense to build up our immune systems and provide our bodies with what they need to carry out the functions they’re so capable of. What we don’t want to do is knock out our own defence system with preparations that do just that.

The reality is that germs evolve. We develop antibodies only for whatever germs and viruses we’ve been infected with. The allopathic ‘flu vaccine’ is a kind of ‘shotgun’ approach aimed at the most prevalent strains but is updated every year precisely because new flu strains keep appearing. In other words, we could have an inoculation and still become ill from a different germ. Whereas, boosting the immune system means our bodies are prepared for whatever hits.

Here, in brief, is how the immune system works. When a virus enters the body, it will go in search of cells to migrate into, as it can’t survive alone. Clever B-cells attach the protein antibodies they make to the invading germs or virus, virtually labelling it as ‘hostile’. The T-cells bring out the big guns and blast them out of the water so to say, destroying them. This process works whether the germ invader is bacterial, or viral or even if it’s just fighting parasites.

Now that we’ve been introduced to the team on the job in our immune system, what can we do to help? For starters, simply adding foods that are natural germicides can assist our body defence mechanism.

First up is Turmeric, it's on our spice racks, so let’s get it into our family meals.

Carrots maintain acid-alkali balance and are a starfighter against several infectious germs.

Cabbage, a humble but powerful defender against the H Pylori bacteria often responsible for stomach ulcers.

Mango is a brilliant germicide and if cold symptoms, sinus infection or rhinitis show up, ripe mangoes are the remedy.

Neem, a brilliant blood cleanser, although bitter in taste but incorporated into our daily diet boosts us powerfully against bacteria and germs.

Ginger- perhaps the ultimate natural medicine! Mixed with honey and fenugreek power is a great expectorant and miraculous for diarrhea and whooping cough. Get it into daily food.

Lemon, the mighty lemon, is not to be overlooked. Lemon will single-handedly boost the immune system as well as protect us against infectious diseases.

Honey is a natural antibiotic. Don’t be shy to let it find its way into everyday eating habits.

 

Let’s allow Pasteur the last word. Despite being vociferous adversaries throughout their lives, on his deathbed Pasteur finally acknowledged that he was wrong and Bechamp was right: “le terrain est tout”, which translated means “the terrain is everything”. Taking care of our body’s terrain and its terrific fighting squad gives us the best chance of winning the war against germs and infections using natural immune boosters and cures.

Contact us on +27 (0) 11 447 0525 or visit www.homeopathjohannesburg.co.za for your health and wellness requirements.

 

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