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What Exactly Does The Thyroid Do?

Over the past months, we’ve discussed numerous health issues surrounding an underactive or overactive thyroid. However, in order to fully grasp the overarching effects of a defective or compromised thyroid we feel it would be worth answering the question “What exactly does the thyroid do?”

The Essential Role of the Thyroid

This small, butterfly-shaped gland positioned in our neck is responsible for making certain hormones. As we know, hormones are chemical messengers which relay instructions to various parts of our bodies. 

The two main hormones produce are known as T3 and T4. You and your Hormones, an education resource, sums it up well, saying,  “The thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate the body's metabolic rate as well as heart and digestive function, muscle control, brain development, mood and bone maintenance. Its correct functioning depends on having a good supply of iodine from the diet.”

That’s a big responsibility for such a small gland.

Logically, this means that when things go wrong, the effects can be felt throughout the body.

An underactive thyroid can produce a range of symptoms including:

  • Fatigue

  • Weight gain

  • Poor memory

  • Depression

  • Infertility

Conversely, an overactive thyroid may result in:

  • Irregular heartbeat

  • Irritability

  • Hair loss

  • Weight loss

  • Tiredness

Are you experiencing any of these symptoms? 

The human body is a complex organism and it’s often difficult to diagnose a problem which shares such a broad range of symptoms with so many other illnesses. 

Fortunately, a simple blood test can confirm whether or not your thyroid is the result of common problems such as weight gain or chronic tiredness.

Dr Sanua believes that the body can, given the right circumstances and tools, go a long way toward healing itself. In this age of a long list of side-effects from common over the counter medicines, a natural approach may be the best option. 

Give us a call and book a consultation today.


 

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